Author Archive

Why Technology Studies Will Set You Up for a Prosperous Career Path

As the sciences evolve; we today are experiencing unprecedented breakthroughs and advancements in technology. This has opened new pathways for the younger generations: who are no longer forced to pick a profession based on the traditional roles of the day, or their family’s class. As a global digital reality emerges, with more complex interfaces, finer
Category: Serial AT Attachment

SATA And Solid State Storage Drives

The advantages of Solid State Storage Drives (SSDs) are dealt with on a separate page. This page is about ways to connect SSDs. Probably the greatest benefit a SSD can give is in a data center, where speed is of the essence but reliability and a long MTBF (Mean Time Between Failures) is also extremely important.
Category: Serial AT Attachment

The Impact Of Latency

SATA Release 4.0 has been discussed but may never happen. There is a growing realization that what may eventually bring about the demise of SATA is not failure to introduce an even faster data transmission rate but the latency that is inescapable with SATA. Latency may be thought of as simply delay. In fact, it
Category: Serial AT Attachment

Plugfests Lead To More Interoperability

SATA-IO lays down specifications that all SATA devices must follow. There are various other bodies, committees and sub-committees; it’s SATA-IO that manufacturers turn to to be certain what they should be making, and users turn to to be certain that a device will be compatible. Plugfests (also known as plugtests or plug tests) are one
Category: Serial AT Attachment

A Revision Marks A Change Of Speed

The speed of a SATA connection is quoted in Arabic numerals (e.g. 150 MB/s). The Roman numerals following a SATA level represent the revision number. So SATA I.0 and SATA III.0 are, respectively, the first and third revisions of the standard. A number of things changed between each revision, but the most obvious change to
Category: Serial AT Attachment

Random Access Memory: Disk Packs To Solid State Drives

The original disks, back in the 1950s and 1960s, came in the form of disk packs that sat on top of disk drives. A single drive topped by a disk pack would come up to an average adult male operator’s navel. The disks were 24 inches in diameter with 100 tracks on each and the
Category: Serial AT Attachment

The IBM AT Set The Standard For Years

The early days of computing are discussed elsewhere on this website, since they have a lot to do with where SATA came from. Early theory said that parallel buses (in which data was sent a byte at a time, and later at two bytes at a time) must be faster than serial buses because in
Category: Serial AT Attachment

SATA Continues To Dominate

It’s rare now to find PATA (parallel ATA) anywhere except in some applications using CompactFlash (CFlash) storage – and, even there, there’s a new CFlash standard that uses SATA. Beyond those small and niche survivals, SATA remains the preferred data transfer bus in consumer computers, whether desktop or laptop. “Consumer” is stressed here because there
Category: Serial AT Attachment

Where Did The Name SATA Come From?

To understand SATA, it is necessary to understand the early days of microcomputing. Back in the early 1960s, there were really only mainframes. A number of people made them; the industry was often referred to as “IBM and the Seven Dwarves.” By the end of the Sixties, what were known as mid-range computers also came
Category: Serial AT Attachment